• Federal Aviation Administration on aviation maintenance

    Visit FAA website for more details www.faa.gov/mechanics/ or get more information with an FAA approved A&P school at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance at www.fixjets.com

    published: 13 Feb 2013
  • Federal Aviation Administration Functions: "This is the FAA" circa 1966

    more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html "A film from the 1960s discussing the FAA and what it does." Public domain film from the Federal Aviation Administration, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). There is a broadband hum in the vocal frequencies of this film which I cannot completely remove. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Aviation_Administration The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is the national aviation authority of the Uni...

    published: 12 Apr 2013
  • FAA Engineering Services: Design. Construct. Install.

    Engineering Services is the FAA's own engineering presence that designs, constructs, implements and modernizes facilities and the technologies used in the National Airspace System. This office supports a variety of services in project management, engineering design, environment & safety, drafting, construction & contract oversight, and installation.

    published: 12 Jul 2016
  • Wake Turbulence Avoidance 1995 FAA Federal Aviation Administration Pilot Training Film

    more at: http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html "Wake Turbulence Avoidance - A Pilot and Air Traffic Controller Briefing... Video production using re-enactments and animation to illustrate the hazards and physical dynamics of wake turbulence caused by aircraft." Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wake_turbulence Wake turbulence is turbulence that forms behind an aircraf...

    published: 22 May 2015
  • A Traveler Meets Air Traffic Control 1963 Federal Aviation Administration FAA

    more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html An FAA controller explains how air traffic control works to a traveling businessman. Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_traffic_control Air traffic control (ATC) is a service provided by ground-based controllers who direct aircraft on the ground and through controlled airspace, and can provide advisory services to aircraf...

    published: 24 Dec 2014
  • FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION 1969 FILM "THE INSPECTORS" 71572

    Created in 1969 and with an introduction by Gen. Jimmy Doolittle -- who single-handedly pioneered instrument flight -- "The Inspectors" shows the work of the Federal Aviation Administration in charting navigation and ILS in new and challenging era for aviation: the jet age. New navigational aids, some of them monitored electronically, are installed and checked out, and high altitude flight paths demarcated. Much of the action in the film takes place at the FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center in Atlantic City. This is an aviation research and development, and test and evaluation facility and the national scientific test base for the Federal Aviation Administration. Technical Center programs include research and development, test and evaluation, and verification and validation in air ...

    published: 08 Apr 2015
  • US Federal Aviation Administration requires drone operators to register

    Drone owners in U.S. will now have to register their aircraft. The U.S. Federal Aviation Agency is expected to open registrations this week. CCTV's Jim Spellman reports.

    published: 18 Nov 2015
  • Stable and Safe - 1968 Federal Aviation Administration Pilot Training Educational Documentary

    This Federal Aviation Administration training film reveals what frequently happens when pilots inadvertently fly into marginal or IFR weather and lose their visual reference, becoming dangerously disoriented. Describes the different types of stability augmentation systems available for use in general aviation. This film has been made available courtesy the United States Federal Aviation Administration. . . WDTVLIVE42 - Transport, technology, and general interest movies from the past - newsreels, documentaries & publicity films from my archives.

    published: 11 Sep 2012
  • Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge FAA-H-8083-25A | Federal Aviation Administration | 1/15

    This video takes care of me! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6kwkHr_D4Q -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge FAA-H-8083-25A | Federal Aviation Administration | Education, Technology & Engineering | Audiobook full unabridged | English | 1/15 Content of the video and Sections beginning time (clickable) - Chapters of the audiobook: please see First comments under this video. "The Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge provides basic knowledge that is essential for pilots. This handbook introduces pilots to the broad spectrum of knowledge that will be needed as they progress in their pilot training. Except for the Code of Federal Regulations pertinent to civil aviation, most of the knowledge areas applicable to pilot certification are presented. This handbook is u...

    published: 17 Oct 2016
  • Vision in Aviation circa 1995 FAA Federal Aviation Administration; Physiology of Flight

    more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html "To See or Not to See" Overview of factors that affect pilots' eyesight, from the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute Physiology of Flight film series. NEW VERSION with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7IwQ8AZHis Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_system The visual system is the part of the cen...

    published: 01 Jan 2015
  • Disorientation (FAA Pilot Training Film) 1973 Federal Aviation Administration

    more at: http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html "Alerts pilots to inflight situations that are potentially disorientating by describing how this physiological phenomenon influences and often distorts flying judgments. It suggests that when physical senses are at variance with cockpit instruments, you should not randomly hit buttons." FAA film FA-09-73 Pilot Training Film playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA6387BA013F9A4D Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far les...

    published: 18 May 2015
  • FAA - Federal Aviation Administration Promo Film - 1966

    Public Domain film from the U.S. Gov. Archives, and edited by Jeff Quitney: http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html Filmed on the cusp of the name change form "Agency" to "Administration", a neat promo featuring earlier '60s clips of 707s & DC-8s. Also included are the FAA's DC-6, B-720 & CV-880! Be sure to check my channel for the best in VINTAGE & RARE airliner videos! https://www.facebook.com/ClassicAirlinerFilms

    published: 13 Apr 2015
  • General Aviation: Fact or Fiction 1973 FAA Federal Aviation Administration

    more at: http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html "General aviation operations account for the largest segment of American air commerce. This video describes general aviation's significant contributions to the American economy and its role as a mode of travel serving a multitude of purposes." FAA film # FA-01-73 Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_aviation General...

    published: 28 Apr 2015
  • Federal Aviation Administration approves 'Moon Express' for 2017 lunar voyage

    For the first time in history, a private company has secured the right to travel to the moon. Moon Express applied for and won permission from the Federal Aviation administration for a 2017 lunar voyage. Their hope is to advance research, secure resources, and pave the way for the colonization of outer space. RT America correspondent Brigida Santos has the story. Find RT America in your area: http://rt.com/where-to-watch/ Or watch us online: http://rt.com/on-air/rt-america-air/ Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTAmerica Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_America

    published: 18 Jan 2017
  • Ice Induced Stall Pilot Training

    This training aid is intended to help pilots understand the phenomenon of tailplane and wing stall while flying in icing conditions. The training also explains icing certification rules. And it recommends cockpit procedures to mitigate ice induced stall in order to maintain controlled flight during unexpected icing encounters. Much has occurred since NASA's original 1998 ice contaminated tailplane stall video. This film updates that training. Specifically addressing the reality that for the past 30 years most icing accidents were caused by wing stall versus tail stall. The FAA wants to make pilots aware that vigilance is necessary to avoid the low-speed stall accidents that occur in icing, especially with the autopilot engaged. The information in this training video supersedes, supplan...

    published: 29 Sep 2016
  • Dusk to Dawn - 1971 Federal Aviation Administration Pilot Training Educational Documentary

    This Federal Aviation Administration training film examines different types of precautions and techniques that pilots should take when flying from dusk to dawn. This film has been made available courtesy the United States Federal Aviation Administration. . . WDTVLIVE42 - Transport, technology, and general interest movies from the past - newsreels, documentaries & publicity films from my archives.

    published: 12 Sep 2012
Federal Aviation Administration on aviation maintenance

Federal Aviation Administration on aviation maintenance

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:35
  • Updated: 13 Feb 2013
  • views: 43598
videos
Visit FAA website for more details www.faa.gov/mechanics/ or get more information with an FAA approved A&P school at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance at www.fixjets.com
https://wn.com/Federal_Aviation_Administration_On_Aviation_Maintenance
Federal Aviation Administration Functions: "This is the FAA" circa 1966

Federal Aviation Administration Functions: "This is the FAA" circa 1966

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:06
  • Updated: 12 Apr 2013
  • views: 2242
videos
more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html "A film from the 1960s discussing the FAA and what it does." Public domain film from the Federal Aviation Administration, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). There is a broadband hum in the vocal frequencies of this film which I cannot completely remove. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Aviation_Administration The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is the national aviation authority of the United States of America. An agency of the United States Department of Transportation, it has authority to regulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S. The Federal Aviation Act of 1958 created the organization under the name "Federal Aviation Agency", and adopted its current name in 1966 when it became a part of the United States Department of Transportation. The FAA's roles include: - Regulating U.S. commercial space transportation - Regulating air navigation facilities' geometry and flight inspection standards - Encouraging and developing civil aeronautics, including new aviation technology - Issuing, suspending, or revoking pilot certificates - Regulating civil aviation to promote safety, especially through local offices called Flight Standards District Offices - Developing and operating a system of air traffic control and navigation for both civil and military aircraft - Researching and developing the National Airspace System and civil aeronautics - Developing and carrying out programs to control aircraft noise and other environmental effects of civil aviation... The Air Commerce Act of May 20, 1926, is the cornerstone of the federal government's regulation of civil aviation... The Act charged the Secretary of Commerce with fostering air commerce, issuing and enforcing air traffic rules, licensing pilots, certifying aircraft, establishing airways, and operating and maintaining aids to air navigation. The newly created Aeronautics Branch, operating under the Department of Commerce assumed primary responsibility for aviation oversight. In fulfilling its civil aviation responsibilities, the Department of Commerce initially concentrated on such functions as safety regulations and the certification of pilots and aircraft... The Aeronautics Branch was renamed the Bureau of Air Commerce in 1934 to reflect its enhanced status within the Department. As commercial flying increased, the Bureau encouraged a group of airlines to establish the first three centers for providing air traffic control (ATC) along the airways. In 1936, the Bureau itself took over the centers and began to expand the ATC system. The pioneer air traffic controllers used maps, blackboards, and mental calculations to ensure the safe separation of aircraft traveling along designated routes between cities. In 1938, the Civil Aeronautics Act transferred the federal civil aviation responsibilities from the Commerce Department to a new independent agency, the Civil Aeronautics Authority... President Franklin D. Roosevelt split the authority into two agencies in 1940, the Civil Aeronautics Administration (CAA) and the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB). CAA was responsible for ATC, airman and aircraft certification, safety enforcement, and airway development. CAB was entrusted with safety regulation, accident investigation, and economic regulation of the airlines... On the eve of America's entry into World War II, CAA began to extend its ATC responsibilities to takeoff and landing operations at airports... The application of radar to ATC helped controllers in their drive to keep abreast of the postwar boom in commercial air transportation... The approaching era of jet travel, and a series of midair collisions (most notable was the 1956 Grand Canyon mid-air collision), prompted passage of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958. This legislation gave the CAA's functions to a new independent body, the Federal Aviation Agency. The act transferred air safety regulation from the CAB to the new FAA... In 1967, a new U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) combined major federal responsibilities for air and surface transport. The Federal Aviation Agency's name changed to the Federal Aviation Administration as it became one of several agencies (e.g., Federal Highway Administration, Federal Railroad Administration, the Coast Guard, and the Saint Lawrence Seaway Commission) within DOT...
https://wn.com/Federal_Aviation_Administration_Functions_This_Is_The_Faa_Circa_1966
FAA Engineering Services: Design. Construct. Install.

FAA Engineering Services: Design. Construct. Install.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:51
  • Updated: 12 Jul 2016
  • views: 1080
videos
Engineering Services is the FAA's own engineering presence that designs, constructs, implements and modernizes facilities and the technologies used in the National Airspace System. This office supports a variety of services in project management, engineering design, environment & safety, drafting, construction & contract oversight, and installation.
https://wn.com/Faa_Engineering_Services_Design._Construct._Install.
Wake Turbulence Avoidance 1995 FAA Federal Aviation Administration Pilot Training Film

Wake Turbulence Avoidance 1995 FAA Federal Aviation Administration Pilot Training Film

  • Order:
  • Duration: 24:17
  • Updated: 22 May 2015
  • views: 4426
videos
more at: http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html "Wake Turbulence Avoidance - A Pilot and Air Traffic Controller Briefing... Video production using re-enactments and animation to illustrate the hazards and physical dynamics of wake turbulence caused by aircraft." Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wake_turbulence Wake turbulence is turbulence that forms behind an aircraft as it passes through the air. This turbulence includes various components, the most important of which are wingtip vortices and jetwash. Jetwash refers simply to the rapidly moving gases expelled from a jet engine; it is extremely turbulent, but of short duration. Wingtip vortices, on the other hand, are much more stable and can remain in the air for up to three minutes after the passage of an aircraft. Wingtip vortices occur when a wing is generating lift. Air from below the wing is drawn around the wingtip into the region above the wing by the lower pressure above the wing, causing a vortex to trail from each wingtip. Wake turbulence exists in the vortex flow behind the wing. The strength of wingtip vortices is determined primarily by the weight and airspeed of the aircraft. Wingtip vortices make up the primary and most dangerous component of wake turbulence. Lift is generated by high pressure below the wing and low pressure above the wing. As the high-pressure air moves around the wingtip to the low pressure, (high pressure always moves towards lower pressure areas) the air rotates, or creates a horizontal "tornado" behind the wings. This tornado sinks lower and lower until it dissipates. Wake turbulence is especially hazardous in the region behind an aircraft in the takeoff or landing phases of flight. During take-off and landing, aircraft operate at high angle of attack. This flight attitude maximizes the formation of strong vortices. In the vicinity of an airport there can be multiple aircraft, all operating at low speed and low height, and this provides extra risk of wake turbulence with reduced height from which to recover from any upset... Fixed wing – level flight At altitude, vortices sink at a rate of 90 to 150 metres per minute and stabilize about 150 to 270 metres below the flight level of the generating aircraft. For this reason, aircraft operating greater than 600 metres above the terrain are considered to be at less risk... Helicopters also produce wake turbulence. Helicopter wakes may be of significantly greater strength than those from a fixed wing aircraft of the same weight... Take-off An aircraft of a lower wake vortex category must not be allowed to take off less than two minutes behind an aircraft of a higher wake vortex category. If the following aircraft does not start its take off roll from the same point as the preceding aircraft, this is increased to three minutes... Warning signs Any uncommanded aircraft movements (such as wing rocking) may be caused by wake. This is why maintaining situational awareness is critical. Ordinary turbulence is not unusual, particularly in the approach phase. A pilot who suspects wake turbulence is affecting his or her aircraft should get away from the wake, execute a missed approach or go-around and be prepared for a stronger wake encounter. The onset of wake can be insidious and even surprisingly gentle. There have been serious accidents where pilots have attempted to salvage a landing after encountering moderate wake only to encounter severe wake turbulence that they were unable to overcome. Pilots should not depend on any aerodynamic warning, but if the onset of wake is occurring, immediate evasive action is vital...
https://wn.com/Wake_Turbulence_Avoidance_1995_Faa_Federal_Aviation_Administration_Pilot_Training_Film
A Traveler Meets Air Traffic Control 1963 Federal Aviation Administration FAA

A Traveler Meets Air Traffic Control 1963 Federal Aviation Administration FAA

  • Order:
  • Duration: 33:17
  • Updated: 24 Dec 2014
  • views: 11364
videos
more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html An FAA controller explains how air traffic control works to a traveling businessman. Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_traffic_control Air traffic control (ATC) is a service provided by ground-based controllers who direct aircraft on the ground and through controlled airspace, and can provide advisory services to aircraft in non-controlled airspace. The primary purpose of ATC worldwide is to prevent collisions, organize and expedite the flow of traffic, and provide information and other support for pilots. In some countries, ATC plays a security or defensive role, or is operated by the military. To prevent collisions, ATC enforces traffic separation rules, which ensure each aircraft maintains a minimum amount of empty space around it at all times. Many aircraft also have collision avoidance systems, which provide additional safety by warning pilots when other aircraft get too close. In many countries, ATC provides services to all private, military, and commercial aircraft operating within its airspace. Depending on the type of flight and the class of airspace, ATC may issue instructions that pilots are required to obey, or advisories (known as flight information in some countries) that pilots may, at their discretion, disregard. Generally the pilot in command is the final authority for the safe operation of the aircraft and may, in an emergency, deviate from ATC instructions to the extent required to maintain safe operation of their aircraft... History In 1921, Croydon Airport, London was the first airport in the world to introduce air traffic control. In America, Air Traffic Control developed three divisions. The first - Air Mail Radio Stations (AMRS) was created in 1922 after World War 1 when the US Post Office began using techniques developed by the Army to direct and track the movements of reconnaissance aircraft. Over time the AMRS morphed into Flight Service Stations. Today's Flight Service Stations do not issue control instructions, but provide pilots with many other flight related informational services. They do relay control instructions from ATC in areas where Flight Service is the only facility with radio or phone coverage. The first Airport Traffic Control Tower, regulating arrivals, departures and surface movement of aircraft at a specific airport, opened in Cleveland in 1930. Approach/Departure Control facilities were created after the invention of RADAR in the 1950s to monitor and control the busy airspace around larger airports. The first Air Route Traffic Control Center, which directs the movement of aircraft between departure and destination was opened in Newark, NJ in 1935, followed in 1936 by Chicago and Cleveland... Airport control The primary method of controlling the immediate airport environment is visual observation from the airport control tower (TWR). The tower is a tall, windowed structure located on the airport grounds. Air traffic controllers are responsible for the separation and efficient movement of aircraft and vehicles operating on the taxiways and runways of the airport itself, and aircraft in the air near the airport, generally 5 to 10 nautical miles (9 to 18 km) depending on the airport procedures. Surveillance displays are also available to controllers at larger airports to assist with controlling air traffic. Controllers may use a radar system called secondary surveillance radar for airborne traffic approaching and departing. These displays include a map of the area, the position of various aircraft, and data tags that include aircraft identification, speed, altitude, and other information described in local procedures. In adverse weather conditions the tower controllers may also use surface movement radar (SMR), surface movement guidance and control systems (SMGCS) or advanced SMGCS to control traffic on the manoeuvring area (taxiways and runway). The areas of responsibility for TWR controllers fall into three general operational disciplines; Local Control or Air Control, Ground Control, and Flight Data/Clearance Delivery—other categories, such as Apron Control or Ground Movement Planner, may exist at extremely busy airports...
https://wn.com/A_Traveler_Meets_Air_Traffic_Control_1963_Federal_Aviation_Administration_Faa
FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION 1969 FILM "THE INSPECTORS" 71572

FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION 1969 FILM "THE INSPECTORS" 71572

  • Order:
  • Duration: 25:00
  • Updated: 08 Apr 2015
  • views: 1932
videos
Created in 1969 and with an introduction by Gen. Jimmy Doolittle -- who single-handedly pioneered instrument flight -- "The Inspectors" shows the work of the Federal Aviation Administration in charting navigation and ILS in new and challenging era for aviation: the jet age. New navigational aids, some of them monitored electronically, are installed and checked out, and high altitude flight paths demarcated. Much of the action in the film takes place at the FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center in Atlantic City. This is an aviation research and development, and test and evaluation facility and the national scientific test base for the Federal Aviation Administration. Technical Center programs include research and development, test and evaluation, and verification and validation in air traffic control, communications, navigation, airports, aircraft safety, and security. The FAA was an outgrowth of the 1938 Civil Aeronautics Act that transferred the federal civil aviation responsibilities from the Commerce Department to a new independent agency, the Civil Aeronautics Authority. The legislation also expanded the government's role by giving them the authority and the power to regulate airline fares and to determine the routes that air carriers would serve. President Franklin D. Roosevelt split the authority into two agencies in 1940, the Civil Aeronautics Administration (CAA) and the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB). CAA was responsible for ATC, airman and aircraft certification, safety enforcement, and airway development. CAB was entrusted with safety regulation, accident investigation, and economic regulation of the airlines. The CAA was part of the Department of Commerce. The CAB was an independent federal agency. On the eve of America's entry into World War II, CAA began to extend its ATC responsibilities to takeoff and landing operations at airports. This expanded role eventually became permanent after the war. The application of radar to ATC helped controllers in their drive to keep abreast of the postwar boom in commercial air transportation. In 1946, meanwhile, Congress gave CAA the added task of administering the federal-aid airport program, the first peacetime program of financial assistance aimed exclusively at promoting development of the nation's civil airports. The approaching era of jet travel, and a series of midair collisions (most notable was the 1956 Grand Canyon mid-air collision), prompted passage of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958. This legislation gave the CAA's functions to a new independent body, the Federal Aviation Agency. The act transferred air safety regulation from the CAB to the new FAA, and also gave the FAA sole responsibility for a common civil-military system of air navigation and air traffic control. The FAA's first administrator, Elwood R. Quesada, was a former Air Force general and adviser to President Eisenhower. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
https://wn.com/Federal_Aviation_Administration_1969_Film_The_Inspectors_71572
US Federal Aviation Administration requires drone operators to register

US Federal Aviation Administration requires drone operators to register

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:26
  • Updated: 18 Nov 2015
  • views: 318
videos
Drone owners in U.S. will now have to register their aircraft. The U.S. Federal Aviation Agency is expected to open registrations this week. CCTV's Jim Spellman reports.
https://wn.com/US_Federal_Aviation_Administration_Requires_Drone_Operators_To_Register
Stable and Safe - 1968 Federal Aviation Administration Pilot Training Educational Documentary

Stable and Safe - 1968 Federal Aviation Administration Pilot Training Educational Documentary

  • Order:
  • Duration: 17:25
  • Updated: 11 Sep 2012
  • views: 5867
videos
This Federal Aviation Administration training film reveals what frequently happens when pilots inadvertently fly into marginal or IFR weather and lose their visual reference, becoming dangerously disoriented. Describes the different types of stability augmentation systems available for use in general aviation. This film has been made available courtesy the United States Federal Aviation Administration. . . WDTVLIVE42 - Transport, technology, and general interest movies from the past - newsreels, documentaries & publicity films from my archives.
https://wn.com/Stable_And_Safe_1968_Federal_Aviation_Administration_Pilot_Training_Educational_Documentary
Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge FAA-H-8083-25A | Federal Aviation Administration | 1/15

Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge FAA-H-8083-25A | Federal Aviation Administration | 1/15

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:44:37
  • Updated: 17 Oct 2016
  • views: 1540
videos
This video takes care of me! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6kwkHr_D4Q -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge FAA-H-8083-25A | Federal Aviation Administration | Education, Technology & Engineering | Audiobook full unabridged | English | 1/15 Content of the video and Sections beginning time (clickable) - Chapters of the audiobook: please see First comments under this video. "The Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge provides basic knowledge that is essential for pilots. This handbook introduces pilots to the broad spectrum of knowledge that will be needed as they progress in their pilot training. Except for the Code of Federal Regulations pertinent to civil aviation, most of the knowledge areas applicable to pilot certification are presented. This handbook is useful to beginning pilots, as well as those pursuing more advanced pilot certificates." (Summary from the preface) Study of the handbook should include the PDF from the FAA, which is available at http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/handbooks_manuals/. This is a Librivox recording. If you want to volunteer please visit https://librivox.org/
https://wn.com/Pilot's_Handbook_Of_Aeronautical_Knowledge_Faa_H_8083_25A_|_Federal_Aviation_Administration_|_1_15
Vision in Aviation circa 1995 FAA Federal Aviation Administration; Physiology of Flight

Vision in Aviation circa 1995 FAA Federal Aviation Administration; Physiology of Flight

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:12
  • Updated: 01 Jan 2015
  • views: 3110
videos
more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html "To See or Not to See" Overview of factors that affect pilots' eyesight, from the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute Physiology of Flight film series. NEW VERSION with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7IwQ8AZHis Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_system The visual system is the part of the central nervous system which gives organisms the ability to process visual detail, as well as enabling the formation of several non-image photo response functions. It detects and interprets information from visible light to build a representation of the surrounding environment. The visual system carries out a number of complex tasks, including the reception of light and the formation of monocular representations; the buildup of a nuclear binocular perception from a pair of two dimensional projections; the identification and categorization of visual objects; assessing distances to and between objects; and guiding body movements in relation to visual objects. The psychological process of visual information is known as visual perception, a lack of which is called blindness. Non-image forming visual functions, independent of visual perception, include the pupillary light reflex (PLR) and circadian photoentrainment... Light entering the eye is refracted as it passes through the cornea. It then passes through the pupil (controlled by the iris) and is further refracted by the lens. The cornea and lens act together as a compound lens to project an inverted image onto the retina... The retina consists of a large number of photoreceptor cells which contain particular protein molecules called opsins. In humans, two types of opsins are involved in conscious vision: rod opsins and cone opsins. (A third type, melanopsin in some of the retinal ganglion cells (RGC), part of the body clock mechanism, is probably not involved in conscious vision, as these RGC do not project to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) but to the pretectal olivary nucleus (PON).) An opsin absorbs a photon (a particle of light) and transmits a signal to the cell through a signal transduction pathway, resulting in hyper-polarization of the photoreceptor. (For more information, see Photoreceptor cell). Rods and cones differ in function. Rods are found primarily in the periphery of the retina and are used to see at low levels of light. Cones are found primarily in the center (or fovea) of the retina. There are three types of cones that differ in the wavelengths of light they absorb; they are usually called short or blue, middle or green, and long or red. Cones are used primarily to distinguish color and other features of the visual world at normal levels of light... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Aerospace_Medical_Institute Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) is the medical certification, education, research, and occupational medicine wing of the Office of Aerospace Medicine (AAM) under the auspices of the Federal Aviation Administration Office of Aviation Safety. The Institute’s primary goal is to enhance aviation safety. CAMI is located at the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center (MMAC) in Oklahoma City... America’s first successful flight was in 1903, but amazingly, five years would pass before the first fatal aviation accident. Since then, safety has been an important concern. In 1926, the Civil Aeronautics Act marshaled the talents of the medical profession to certify that all aviators are physically fit to fly. In August 1958, the Federal Aviation Act, which created an independent federal agency, was passed. As part of the organizational changes that followed the FAA Act of 1958, an Office of the Civil Air Surgeon was established. On 31 October 1959 plans were announced to create the Civil Aeromedical Research Institute (CARI) which was established in 1961. A new CARI building was opened at the Aeronautical Center in Oklahoma City. In 1965 the Institute’s organizational scope and structure were enlarged and CARI was renamed the Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI). The organizational changes designated all research laboratories as an aeromedical research branch along with aeromedical certification, aeromedical education, and a medical clinic branch. The Institute’s people— scientists, engineers, physicians, medical specialists, educators, pilots, technicians, communicators, and others — all merged as a team. In 2001, CAMI was expanded to incorporate commercial space transportation, and its name was changed to the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute...
https://wn.com/Vision_In_Aviation_Circa_1995_Faa_Federal_Aviation_Administration_Physiology_Of_Flight
Disorientation (FAA Pilot Training Film) 1973 Federal Aviation Administration

Disorientation (FAA Pilot Training Film) 1973 Federal Aviation Administration

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  • Duration: 14:09
  • Updated: 18 May 2015
  • views: 4361
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more at: http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html "Alerts pilots to inflight situations that are potentially disorientating by describing how this physiological phenomenon influences and often distorts flying judgments. It suggests that when physical senses are at variance with cockpit instruments, you should not randomly hit buttons." FAA film FA-09-73 Pilot Training Film playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA6387BA013F9A4D Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vestibular_system The vestibular system, in most mammals, is the sensory system that provides the leading contribution about the sense of balance and spatial orientation for the purpose of coordinating movement with balance. Together with the cochlea, a part of the auditory system, it constitutes the labyrinth of the inner ear in most mammals, situated in the vestibulum in the inner ear... As movements consist of rotations and translations, the vestibular system comprises two components: the semicircular canal system, which indicate rotational movements; and the otoliths, which indicate linear accelerations. The vestibular system sends signals primarily to the neural structures that control eye movements, and to the muscles that keep an animal upright. The projections to the former provide the anatomical basis of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, which is required for clear vision; and the projections to the muscles that control posture are necessary to keep an animal upright. The brain uses information from the vestibular system in the head and from proprioception throughout the body to understand the body's dynamics and kinematics (including its position and acceleration) from moment to moment... The semicircular canal system detects rotational movements. The semicircular canals are its main tools to achieve this detection. Structure Since the world is three-dimensional, the vestibular system contains three semicircular canals in each labyrinth. They are approximately orthogonal (right angles) to each other, and are called the horizontal (or lateral), the anterior semicircular canal (or superior) and the posterior (or inferior) semicircular canal. Anterior and posterior canals may be collectively called vertical semicircular canals. - Movement of fluid within the horizontal semicircular canal corresponds to rotation of the head around a vertical axis (i.e. the neck), as when doing a pirouette. - The anterior and posterior semicircular canals detect rotations of the head in the sagittal plane (as when nodding), and in the frontal plane, as when cartwheeling. Both anterior and posterior canals are orientated at approximately 45° between frontal and sagittal planes. The movement of fluid pushes on a structure called the cupula, which contains hair cells that transduce the mechanical movement to electrical signals... Push-pull systems The canals are arranged in such a way that each canal on the left side has an almost parallel counterpart on the right side. Each of these three pairs works in a push-pull fashion: when one canal is stimulated, its corresponding partner on the other side is inhibited, and vice versa. This push-pull system makes it possible to sense all directions of rotation: while the right horizontal canal gets stimulated during head rotations to the right (Fig 2), the left horizontal canal gets stimulated (and thus predominantly signals) by head rotations to the left. Vertical canals are coupled in a crossed fashion, i.e. stimulations that are excitatory for an anterior canal are also inhibitory for the contralateral posterior, and vice versa...
https://wn.com/Disorientation_(Faa_Pilot_Training_Film)_1973_Federal_Aviation_Administration
FAA - Federal Aviation Administration Promo Film - 1966

FAA - Federal Aviation Administration Promo Film - 1966

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  • Duration: 7:05
  • Updated: 13 Apr 2015
  • views: 3377
videos
Public Domain film from the U.S. Gov. Archives, and edited by Jeff Quitney: http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html Filmed on the cusp of the name change form "Agency" to "Administration", a neat promo featuring earlier '60s clips of 707s & DC-8s. Also included are the FAA's DC-6, B-720 & CV-880! Be sure to check my channel for the best in VINTAGE & RARE airliner videos! https://www.facebook.com/ClassicAirlinerFilms
https://wn.com/Faa_Federal_Aviation_Administration_Promo_Film_1966
General Aviation: Fact or Fiction 1973 FAA Federal Aviation Administration

General Aviation: Fact or Fiction 1973 FAA Federal Aviation Administration

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  • Duration: 14:36
  • Updated: 28 Apr 2015
  • views: 3235
videos
more at: http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html "General aviation operations account for the largest segment of American air commerce. This video describes general aviation's significant contributions to the American economy and its role as a mode of travel serving a multitude of purposes." FAA film # FA-01-73 Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_aviation General aviation (GA) is all civil aviation operations other than scheduled air services and non-scheduled air transport operations for remuneration or hire. General aviation flights range from gliders and powered parachutes to corporate business jet flights. The majority of the world's air traffic falls into this category, and most of the world's airports serve general aviation exclusively. General aviation covers a large range of activities, both commercial and non-commercial, including flying clubs, flight training, agricultural aviation, light aircraft manufacturing and maintenance... General aviation in North America General aviation is particularly popular in North America, with over 6,300 airports available for public use by pilots of general aviation aircraft (around 5,200 airports in the U.S., and over 1,000 in Canada). In comparison, scheduled flights operate from around 560 airports in the U.S. According to the U.S. Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, general aviation provides more than one percent of the United States' GDP, accounting for 1.3 million jobs in professional services and manufacturing. Regulation and safety Most countries have authorities that oversee all civil aviation, including general aviation, adhering to the standardized codes of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Examples include the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in the United States, the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) in the United Kingdom, the Luftfahrt-Bundesamt (LBA) in Germany, and Transport Canada in Canada. Aviation accident rate statistics are necessarily estimates. According to the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, in 2005 general aviation in the United States (excluding charter) suffered 1.31 fatal accidents for every 100,000 hours of flying in that country, compared to 0.016 for scheduled airline flights. In Canada, recreational flying accounted for 0.7 fatal accidents for every 1000 aircraft, while air taxi accounted for 1.1 fatal accidents for every 100,000 hours. More experienced GA pilots appear generally safer, although the relations between flight hours, accident frequency, and accident rates are complex and often difficult to assess... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_aircraft A light aircraft is an aircraft that has a maximum gross takeoff weight of 12,500 lb (5,670 kg) or less. Many light aircraft are used commercially for passenger and freight transport, sightseeing, photography, and other similar roles as well as personal use. Examples of light aircraft include: - Cessna, the entire range of propeller-driven aircraft from the Cessna 120 up through the Cessna 208 - Piper, all models - Beechcraft, the models such as the Beechcraft Bonanza and the Beechcraft Baron that are not jet propelled. - Others such as Cirrus Design, the GippsAero GA8 Airvan, the Aviat Husky, the Robin DR400, and the civil aviation Grumman Aircraft. Examples of aircraft that are at the maximum gross takeoff weight for this category include the de Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter and Beechcraft B200 Super King Air. Uses The many uses of light aircraft include aerial surveying, such as monitoring pipelines. They are also used for light cargo operations, such as "feeding" cargo hubs,[5] as well as some passenger operations. Light aircraft are also used for marketing purposes, such as banner towing and skywriting. Primary flight instruction is also conducted in light aircraft. Finally, most personal aircraft are light aircraft, the most popular being the Cessna 172. Larger light aircraft, such as twin turboprops and very light jets are often used as business aircraft... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aircraft_Owners_and_Pilots_Association The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) is a Frederick, Maryland-based American non-profit political organization that advocates for general aviation. ... AOPA incorporated on May 15, 1939... AOPA's membership consists mainly of general aviation pilots in the United States... With 384,915 members in 2012, AOPA is the largest aviation association in the world...
https://wn.com/General_Aviation_Fact_Or_Fiction_1973_Faa_Federal_Aviation_Administration
Federal Aviation Administration approves 'Moon Express' for 2017 lunar voyage

Federal Aviation Administration approves 'Moon Express' for 2017 lunar voyage

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  • Duration: 4:04
  • Updated: 18 Jan 2017
  • views: 3080
videos
For the first time in history, a private company has secured the right to travel to the moon. Moon Express applied for and won permission from the Federal Aviation administration for a 2017 lunar voyage. Their hope is to advance research, secure resources, and pave the way for the colonization of outer space. RT America correspondent Brigida Santos has the story. Find RT America in your area: http://rt.com/where-to-watch/ Or watch us online: http://rt.com/on-air/rt-america-air/ Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTAmerica Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_America
https://wn.com/Federal_Aviation_Administration_Approves_'Moon_Express'_For_2017_Lunar_Voyage
Ice Induced Stall Pilot Training

Ice Induced Stall Pilot Training

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  • Duration: 29:53
  • Updated: 29 Sep 2016
  • views: 35047
videos
This training aid is intended to help pilots understand the phenomenon of tailplane and wing stall while flying in icing conditions. The training also explains icing certification rules. And it recommends cockpit procedures to mitigate ice induced stall in order to maintain controlled flight during unexpected icing encounters. Much has occurred since NASA's original 1998 ice contaminated tailplane stall video. This film updates that training. Specifically addressing the reality that for the past 30 years most icing accidents were caused by wing stall versus tail stall. The FAA wants to make pilots aware that vigilance is necessary to avoid the low-speed stall accidents that occur in icing, especially with the autopilot engaged. The information in this training video supersedes, supplants, and replaces the instruction in all previous NASA tail stall icing training videos.
https://wn.com/Ice_Induced_Stall_Pilot_Training
Dusk to Dawn - 1971 Federal Aviation Administration Pilot Training Educational Documentary

Dusk to Dawn - 1971 Federal Aviation Administration Pilot Training Educational Documentary

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  • Duration: 25:03
  • Updated: 12 Sep 2012
  • views: 4537
videos
This Federal Aviation Administration training film examines different types of precautions and techniques that pilots should take when flying from dusk to dawn. This film has been made available courtesy the United States Federal Aviation Administration. . . WDTVLIVE42 - Transport, technology, and general interest movies from the past - newsreels, documentaries & publicity films from my archives.
https://wn.com/Dusk_To_Dawn_1971_Federal_Aviation_Administration_Pilot_Training_Educational_Documentary